The Office of the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) has announced that President Trump is moving forward with additional tariffs in its Section 301 investigation involving China’s acts, policies and practices related to forced technology transfers and intellectual property rights. The USTR has finalized a third list of Harmonized Tariff Schedule (HTS) subheadings resulting in additional tariffs of $200 billion on imports of Chinese products. The additional tariffs will go into effect September 24, 2018, and will be 10 percent at the start. The USTR has stated that these tariffs will increase to 25 percent on January 1, 2019. Continue Reading United States to Implement Additional Import Tariffs on $200 Billion of Chinese Products

On August 16, 2018, the United States implemented retaliatory tariffs of 25 percent on U.S. imports of 279 Chinese products covering an estimated trade value of $16 billion in 2018. This was in addition to the $34 billion in tariffs implemented in June 2018.

With these tariffs in place, the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) has announced procedures to request the exclusion of products subject to this additional duty. In a notice published today in the Federal Register, the USTR has provided the criteria and detailed guidance for any product exclusion request application. Each request must specifically identify a particular product and provide supporting data and the rationale for the proposed exclusion. The USTR will not consider exclusion requests using criteria that cannot be made available to the public. Each request will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis. The USTR has specified, however, that the following information must be provided:

  • Identification of the particular product in terms of the physical characteristics (e.g., dimensions, material composition, or other characteristics) that distinguish it from other products within the covered 8-digit subheading. The USTR will not consider requests that identify the product at issue in terms of the identity of the producer, importer, ultimate consumer, actual use or chief use, or trademarks or tradenames. The USTR will not consider requests that identify the product using criteria that cannot be made available to the public.
  • The 10-digit subheading of the HTSUS applicable to the particular product requested for exclusion.
  • The annual quantity and value of the Chinese-origin product that the applicant purchased in each of the last three years.

Continue Reading U.S. Trade Representative Announces Section 301 Product Exclusion Process for Second List of Chinese Products Subject to 25 Percent Tariff

The U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) has closed the public comment period on whether to take further action in the form of an additional 10 or 25 percent tariff on certain products imported into the United States from China with an annual trade value of approximately $200 billion. Nearly 6,000 comments were received during the comment period, which focused on the third list (or tranche) of over 6,000 Harmonized Tariff Schedule (HTS) subheadings proposed by the USTR on July 17, 2018 (see annex to 83 Federal Register 33608). This followed a marathon six-day public hearing featuring a parade of witnesses who mostly complained of the injury their U.S. companies would face if these tariffs were implemented. Highlighting this concern, more than 150 U.S. trade groups filed a joint letter opposing the proposed tariffs and arguing that, if implemented, such tariffs and the continuing “tit-for-tat tariff escalation with China only serves to expand the harm to more U.S. economic interests, including farmers, families, businesses, and workers.” The letter states that any tariffs will serve to only invite additional Chinese retaliation and “cause significant supply chain disruptions” since the assumptions that U.S. companies “can simply move their production out of China are incorrect.”

Despite the outcry that U.S. companies, manufacturers, service providers and consumers will bear the brunt of any new proposed tariffs, President Trump on Friday, September 7, 2018, in remarks to reporters, stated that “the $200 billion we are talking about could take place very soon” and that his administration is prepared to seek tariffs on another $267 billion on Chinese goods “if I want.”

As reported by Law360 this week, a California federal judge struck down a food additive exporter’s attempt to throw out claims saying it had smuggled glycine into the United States from China without paying more than $11 million in required duties, calling the exporter’s use of the Fifth Amendment “both a sword and shield.”

View the article: Glycine Exporter Can’t Dodge $11M Smuggling Scheme Claim

The Office of the United States Trade Representative (USTR) has finalized and released its second list of Harmonized Tariff Schedule (HTS) subheadings totaling approximately $16 billion worth of imports from China that will be subject to a 25 percent retaliatory tariff as part of the U.S. government’s ongoing Section 301 investigation and response to China’s intellectual property and forced technology transfer practices. This second list supplements the first list that went into effect on July 6, 2018, which totaled approximately $34 billion of imports from China. Combined, the two lists now cover approximately $50 billion worth of Chinese imports.

The second list contains 279 of the original 284 HTS tariff lines that were on a proposed HTS subheading list released on June 15, 2018. U.S. Customs and Border Protection will begin to collect the additional duties on these imports on August 23.

The Department of Commerce has announced the initiation of a Section 232 investigation into whether the present quantity and circumstances of uranium ore and product imports into the United States threaten to impair national security. The decision was in response to a petition filed by two U.S. uranium mining companies and consultations with industry stakeholders, members of Congress, the Department of Defense, Department of Energy and other interested parties. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross has sent a letter to Secretary of Defense James Mattis informing him of the initiation of the investigation. Continue Reading Department of Commerce Initiates Section 232 Investigation into Uranium Imports

On July 13, 2018, the Department of Commerce’s Bureau of Industry and Security issued an order terminating the April 15, 2018 Denial Order against Zhongxing Telecommunications Equipment Corporation and ZTE Kangxun Telecommunications Ltd. (collectively, ZTE). The order confirms that ZTE paid the $1 billion penalty and complied with the requirement of depositing $400 million in a U.S. bank escrow account. This $1.4 billion amount was in addition to the $892 million in penalties ZTE paid under its earlier settlement agreement for U.S. export law violations that occurred when it supplied telecommunications equipment to North Korea and Iran.

In a brief statement, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross stated, “While we lifted the ban on ZTE, the Department will remain vigilant as we closely monitor ZTE’s actions to ensure compliance with all U.S. laws and regulations … Three interlocking elements – a suspended denial order, the $400 million in escrow, and a compliance team selected by and answerable to the Department – will allow the Department to protect U.S. national security.”

What a week for U.S.-China trade relations! On July 6, the United States began imposing 25 percent tariffs on approximately $34 billion worth of Chinese products imported into the United States. China then retaliated by imposing tariffs of its own on $34 billion worth of U.S. exports to China, which the United States called “inappropriate” and prompted the United States to announce plans to impose a 25 percent tariff on another $16 billion of Chinese goods. Next, the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) indicated that it did not like China’s reaction and was considering imposing a 10 percent tariff on an additional $200 billion of imports from China.

To recap:

  1. U.S. Customs and Border Protection is now imposing a 25 percent tariff on numerous goods from China;
  2. the USTR is reviewing a supplemental list of Harmonized Tariff Schedule categories to possibly implement a 25 percent tariff on $16 billion worth of Chinese goods – a hearing on these categories will be held July 24-25; and
  3. the process for submitting comments and participating in another public hearing in late August regarding the proposed 10 percent tariff on the $200 billion worth of Chinese goods has just been announced.

If that weren’t enough, in testimony before the House Financial Services Committee on Thursday, July 12, Treasury Secretary Stephen Mnuchin was harshly questioned on the administration’s wisdom and strategy concerning these tariffs. Mnuchin denied that the United States is in a trade war with anyone, despite the views of other key trading partners. China’s Ministry of Commerce, for example, in its strongest statement yet, stated that the United States is “not only launching a trade war with China, but also with the whole world, dragging the world economy into danger” and becoming “an enemy to all.”

As reported in a Trump and Trade Update dated June 8, 2018, the Department of Commerce reached a superseding settlement agreement with Zhongxing Telecommunications Equipment Corporation of Shenzhen, China (ZTE Corporation) and ZTE Kangxun Telecommunications Ltd. of Hi-New Shenzhen, China (ZTE Kangxun) (collectively, ZTE) to remove the Department of Commerce’s Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) denial order imposed as a result of ZTE’s violations of its March 2017 settlement agreement. BIS has now published the superseding settlement agreement. Continue Reading ZTE Corporation Moves Closer to Removal of Denial Order

As reported in a prior post, the United States on July 6, 2018 began imposing 25 percent tariffs on approximately $34 billion worth of Chinese products imported into the United States. This was the result of the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) undertaking a Section 301 investigation into “China’s Acts, Policies, and Practices Related to Technology Transfer, Intellectual Property, and Innovation.” Shortly after these tariffs were implemented, China retaliated by imposing tariffs on $34 billion worth of U.S. exports to China. In response, U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer announced yesterday, July 10, 2018, “As a result of China’s retaliation and failure to change its practices, the President has ordered USTR to begin the process of imposing tariffs of 10 percent on an additional $200 billion of Chinese imports.” He added, “For over a year, the Trump Administration has patiently urged China to stop its unfair practices, open its market, and engage in true market competition. We have been very clear and detailed regarding the specific changes China should undertake. Unfortunately, China has not changed its behavior – behavior that puts the future of the U.S. economy at risk. Rather than address our legitimate concerns, China has begun to retaliate against U.S. products. There is no justification for such action.” Continue Reading USTR Proposes Additional 10 Percent Tariff Against Wider Range of Chinese Products Subject to USTR Review and Public Comment