In connection with President Donald Trump’s May 8, 2018 decision to cease U.S. participation in the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) and to re-impose all sanctions lifted or waived in connection with the JCPOA, the president has issued a new Iran-related Executive Order, “Reimposing Certain Sanctions With Respect to Iran.” This completes the first of two wind-down periods for the re-imposition of certain Iranian sanctions. The terms in the Executive Order are effective at 12:01 a.m. Eastern Daylight Time (EDT) on August 7, 2018. In addition, certain wind-down general licenses that allowed limited continued actions involving Iran will expire at 11:59 p.m. EDT on August 6, 2018.

The U.S. government will re-impose the following sanctions that were lifted pursuant to the JCPOA, including sanctions on associated services related to the activities below:

  • Sanctions on the purchase or acquisition of U.S. dollar banknotes by the government of Iran;
  • Sanctions on Iran’s trade in gold or precious metals;
  • Sanctions on the direct or indirect sale, supply, or transfer to or from Iran of graphite, raw or semi-finished metals such as aluminum and steel, coal, and software for integrating industrial processes;
  • Sanctions on significant transactions related to the purchase or sale of Iranian rials, or the maintenance of significant funds or accounts outside the territory of Iran denominated in the Iranian rial;
  • Sanctions on the purchase, subscription to, or facilitation of the issuance of Iranian sovereign debt; and
  • Sanctions on Iran’s automotive sector.

In addition, the U.S. government has revoked the following JCPOA-related authorizations under U.S. primary sanctions regarding Iran:

  • The importation into the United States of Iranian-origin carpets and foodstuffs and certain related financial transactions pursuant to general licenses under the Iranian Transactions and Sanctions Regulations, 31 C.F.R. part 560 (ITSR);
  • Activities undertaken pursuant to specific licenses issued in connection with the Statement of Licensing Policy for Activities Related to the Export or Re-export to Iran of Commercial Passenger Aircraft and Related Parts and Services (JCPOA SLP); and
  • Activities undertaken pursuant to General License I relating to contingent contracts for activities eligible for authorization under the JCPOA SLP.

For further assistance, the Department of the Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control has published frequently asked questions relating to this Executive Order and the re-imposition of certain sanctions.

The second 180-day wind-down period will end on November 4, 2018, and the remaining sanctions that had been lifted or waived pursuant to the JCPOA will become effective again on November 5, 2018.

In response to the United States’ withdrawal from the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA, also informally known as the Iran nuclear deal) on May 8, 2018, the European Union (EU) has announced that it will take several actions in an effort to continue the full implementation of the JCPOA and to protect EU businesses. These actions are:

  • Initiate the formal process to activate the “blocking statute” by updating the list of U.S. sanctions on Iran falling within its scope. The blocking statute forbids EU persons from complying with U.S. extraterritorial sanctions, allows companies to recover damages arising from such sanctions from the person causing them, and nullifies the effect in the EU of any foreign court judgments based on them. The intent is to have these blocking regulations in force before August 6, 2018, when the first wind-down period ends and certain U.S. trade and economic sanctions are reinstated.
  • Begin the formal process to remove obstacles for the European Investment Bank (EIB) to decide under the EU budget guarantee to finance activities outside the EU in Iran. This will allow the EIB to support EU investment in Iran and could be useful for small and medium-sized companies.

Before full implementation of these actions, the European Parliament and the Council of the European Union will have up to a two-month period to object to these measures. The EU has also encouraged the following actions:

  • As confidence-building measures, the European Commission will continue and strengthen the ongoing sectoral cooperation with, and assistance to, Iran, including in the energy sector and as to small and medium-sized companies. Financial assistance through development cooperation or partnership instruments will also be mobilized.
  • The Commission is encouraging member states to explore the possibility of one-off bank transfers to the Central Bank of Iran. This could help the Iranian authorities to receive their oil-related revenues, particularly with U.S. sanctions that could target EU entities active in oil transactions with Iran.

Once implemented, these measures will likely leave foreign companies in the difficult position of determining any associated risks and potential penalties of continuing business transactions in Iran in support of the EU position to maintain the terms of the JCPOA, or risk running afoul of U.S. secondary sanctions pertaining to Iran that seek to limit and possibly penalize non-U.S. companies that conduct business in Iran as well as in the United States.

President Trump has announced that the United States will withdraw from the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA, also informally known as the Iran nuclear deal) that was entered into in 2015 by Iran, the United States, China, France, Germany, Russia and the United Kingdom. The JCPOA was negotiated in an effort to ensure that Iran’s nuclear program would be used exclusively for non-military, peaceful means. On January 16, 2016, the JCPOA was formally implemented and certain trade and economic sanctions against Iran were relaxed by the other parties to the deal. From its inception, the Iran nuclear deal has had its share of proponents and critics, and was a hot-button issue during the 2016 presidential election. During the campaign, and since, President Trump repeatedly stated that the deal was “one of the worst and most one-sided transactions the United States has ever entered into.” In making today’s announcement, President Trump stated that the JCPOA was “defective at its core” since it would not prevent Iran from ultimately developing a nuclear bomb. He argued that the sunset provisions of the deal and the onsite inspection provisions were clearly inadequate, and at the time when the United States had “maximum leverage,” it entered into a deal that gave Iran, a “leading state sponsor of terrorism,” billions of dollars. The president called the agreement “a great embarrassment to me as a citizen and all citizens of the United States.” Continue Reading President Trump Announces U.S. Withdrawal from Iran Nuclear Deal