On April 9, 2019, the U.S. Department of the Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) announced a $639,023,750 settlement with Standard Chartered Bank (SCB), a UK-based financial institution, over potential civil liability related to alleged violations of the now-repealed U.S. economic sanctions on Burma and Sudan and the continuing sanctions on Cuba, Iran and

In his second State of the Union address to Congress, President Donald Trump noted that he campaigned on several core promises, including “to defend American jobs and demand fair trade for American workers.” He argued that his administration has “moved with urgency and historic speed to confront problems neglected by leaders of both parties over

The U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) unsealed two separate indictments on Monday, January 28, 2019, charging Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei with 23 counts of criminal activity. In the Eastern District of New York (EDNY), a 13-count indictment was released charging four defendants affiliated with Huawei. In the indictment, Huawei Technologies Co., Ltd., Huawei Device USA Inc., Skycom Tech Co. Ltd. (Skycom) and Huawei’s Chief Financial Officer Wanzhou Meng were charged with a variety of crimes, including bank fraud, conspiracy to commit bank fraud, wire fraud and violations of the International Emergency Economic Powers Act (IEEPA), which serves as the statutory authority for the Iranian Transactions Sanctions Regulations (ITSR). In the Western District of Washington, the second unsealed indictment charges Huawei Device Co., Ltd. and Huawei Device USA, Inc. with 10 counts of theft of trade secrets conspiracy, attempted theft of trade secrets, wire fraud and obstruction of justice where Huawei employees were allegedly encouraged to steal technology from T-Mobile USA, Inc., a large U.S. telecommunications company.
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On November 5, 2018, the U.S. government fully re-imposed sanctions on Iran as a result of the cessation of the United States’ participation in the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) (see Trump and Trade Update dated May 8, 2018). November 5 marked the end of the 180-day wind-down period for activities that had

U.S. Secretary of State Michael Pompeo announced on October 3, 2018, that the United States would terminate the 1955 “Treaty of Amity” with Iran. The decision was triggered by a ruling issued earlier in the day by the International Court of Justice (ICJ), which ordered the United States to “remove, by means of its choosing,

In connection with President Donald Trump’s May 8, 2018 decision to cease U.S. participation in the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) and to re-impose all sanctions lifted or waived in connection with the JCPOA, the president has issued a new Iran-related Executive Order, “Reimposing Certain Sanctions With Respect to Iran.” This completes the first of two wind-down periods for the re-imposition of certain Iranian sanctions. The terms in the Executive Order are effective at 12:01 a.m. Eastern Daylight Time (EDT) on August 7, 2018. In addition, certain wind-down general licenses that allowed limited continued actions involving Iran will expire at 11:59 p.m. EDT on August 6, 2018.
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In response to the United States’ withdrawal from the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA, also informally known as the Iran nuclear deal) on May 8, 2018, the European Union (EU) has announced that it will take several actions in an effort to continue the full implementation of the JCPOA and to protect EU businesses.

President Trump has announced that the United States will withdraw from the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA, also informally known as the Iran nuclear deal) that was entered into in 2015 by Iran, the United States, China, France, Germany, Russia and the United Kingdom. The JCPOA was negotiated in an effort to ensure that Iran’s nuclear program would be used exclusively for non-military, peaceful means. On January 16, 2016, the JCPOA was formally implemented and certain trade and economic sanctions against Iran were relaxed by the other parties to the deal. From its inception, the Iran nuclear deal has had its share of proponents and critics, and was a hot-button issue during the 2016 presidential election. During the campaign, and since, President Trump repeatedly stated that the deal was “one of the worst and most one-sided transactions the United States has ever entered into.” In making today’s announcement, President Trump stated that the JCPOA was “defective at its core” since it would not prevent Iran from ultimately developing a nuclear bomb. He argued that the sunset provisions of the deal and the onsite inspection provisions were clearly inadequate, and at the time when the United States had “maximum leverage,” it entered into a deal that gave Iran, a “leading state sponsor of terrorism,” billions of dollars. The president called the agreement “a great embarrassment to me as a citizen and all citizens of the United States.”
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The Department of the Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) has designated 14 individuals and entities for sanctions arising from serious human rights abuses and censorship in Iran and support of designated Iranian weapons proliferators. According to Treasury Secretary Steven T. Mnuchin, “The United States will not stand by while the Iranian regime continues