As reported in our post of January 25, 2019, members of the 116th session of Congress are seeking ways to address President Donald Trump’s authority to unilaterally impose tariffs under various statutes. This trend continued on January 30, 2019, with the bipartisan introduction of the Bicameral Congressional Trade Authority Act. Introduced by Sens. Mark Warner (D-VA) and Pat Toomey (R-PA), this bill would restore to Congress its Article I constitutional authority over foreign trade and commerce, specifically focusing on tariffs implemented under the claim of “national security.” The senators stated that recent Trump administration Section 232 actions have been economically disruptive and have damaged U.S. relationships with its allies, including Mexico, Canada, Japan, the EU and India. Continue Reading Additional Legislation Introduced in Congress Seeks to Curtail Executive Branch’s Authority to Implement Section 232 Tariffs

The Department of Commerce has announced the initiation of a Section 232 investigation into whether the present quantity and circumstances of uranium ore and product imports into the United States threaten to impair national security. The decision was in response to a petition filed by two U.S. uranium mining companies and consultations with industry stakeholders, members of Congress, the Department of Defense, Department of Energy and other interested parties. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross has sent a letter to Secretary of Defense James Mattis informing him of the initiation of the investigation. Continue Reading Department of Commerce Initiates Section 232 Investigation into Uranium Imports

Energy Fuels Inc. and Ur-Energy Inc. (the petitioners) have jointly submitted a petition to the U.S. Department of Commerce for relief under Section 232 of the Trade Expansion Act of 1962 from imports of uranium products from state-owned and state-subsidized enterprises in Russia, Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan. According to the petition, such imports now supply nearly 40 percent of U.S. demand and threaten U.S. national security. Despite uranium’s critical role in the United States supporting clean electricity and the national defense, “imports of cheap, foreign state-subsidized uranium have swelled in recent years to the point that domestic suppliers currently provide less than 5% of our nation’s demand.” As recently as 1980, the petitioners argue, “U.S. producers supplied nearly 100% of our domestic uranium needs, and in 1989 the DOC initiated a Section 232 investigation at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy (“DOE”) because of concerns that uranium imports exceeded 37.5% at that time. The problem is far worse now.” The petition also notes that China is significantly growing its state-owned nuclear enterprises and intends to penetrate the U.S. market with nuclear fuel that will directly compete with U.S. uranium miners. Under U.S. law, the petitioners argue that the warheads in U.S. nuclear weapons must be manufactured from uranium sourced from U.S. mines; tritium (an essential component of nuclear weapons) must be produced in a U.S. reactor using domestic uranium; and highly-enriched and fabricated uranium fuel for the U.S. Navy must be U.S. in origin. If this import trend continues and the condition of the U.S. uranium mining industry continues to worsen, the petitioners contend that the United States will lose the ability to supply these essential national security requirements with domestic sources. The petition seeks remedies that will set a quota to limit U.S. uranium imports, effectively reserving 25 percent of the U.S. nuclear market for U.S. uranium production. It also seeks implementation of a requirement for U.S. federal utilities and agencies to buy U.S. uranium in accordance with President Trump’s Buy American policy.

Once the Department of Commerce initiates the investigation, it will have 270 days to prepare a report for the president. Following receipt of that report, the president will have 90 days to act on any recommendations and take action if necessary to “adjust the imports of an article and its derivatives” and/or pursue other lawful non-trade related actions necessary to address the threat. A full copy of the petition is available on Energy Fuels’ website.