Section 301 Investigation

The Office of the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) has announced that it is extending the amount of time certain goods exported from China will have to enter the United States before an additional Section 301 tariff increase from 10 percent to 25 percent is imposed. As we reported on May 9, President Donald Trump

In a filing with the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) seeking emergency clearance for an information collection and form approval, the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) formally indicated that it is “establishing a process by which U.S. stakeholders can request the exclusion of particular products classified within a covered tariff subheading from

After trade negotiations between China and the United States faltered last week, China announced on May 13, 2019, that it would retaliate against the United States’ increase in Section 301 tariffs on certain Chinese products from 10 percent to 25 percent (see Trump and Trade Update of May 9, 2019). China’s Ministry of Finance announced that as of June 1, 2019, it will increase the tariffs on imports of U.S. goods valued at approximately $60 billion in response to the increase in tariffs implemented by the United States. While not adding goods to its list at this time, China will be increasing the tariffs it imposed on over 5,000 U.S. products on September 24, 2018 (see Trump and Trade Update of September 19, 2018). With the May 13 announcement, the Ministry of Finance indicated that on June 1, 2019, 2,493 U.S. products will now be subject to a 25 percent tariff; 1,078 products will be increased to a 20 percent tariff; and 974 products will be subject to a 10 percent tariff. A 5 percent tariff will remain in place on 595 U.S. products. (Note: All of the linked documents related to the announcement by China’s Ministry of Finance are in Chinese. As soon as English translations become available, they will be posted.)

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On the same day that the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) raised the Section 301 tariff rate to 25 percent on imports from China valued at $200 billion that had been subject to a 10 percent tariff rate since September 24, 2018, the USTR also announced its fourth batch of products to be

Since publication of yesterday’s update (see Trump Administration Increases Section 301 Import Tariff on Third Tranche of Chinese Products from 10% to 25%), questions have been raised as to whether the tariff increase affects shipments from China in process, or “on the water.” The USTR has indicated that products of China that are covered

Today, the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) formally published a notice in the Federal Register confirming what President Donald Trump tweeted out last Sunday: U.S. imports of Chinese products, valued at $200 billion, that have been subject to a Section 301 10 percent tariff since September 24, 2018, will face a 25 percent

Just days after it became publicly known that U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) Robert Lighthizer was preparing to implement an exclusion request process for the third tranche of imported Chinese products valued at $200 billion and subject to a 10 percent tariff under Section 301 of the Trade Act of 1974 (see Trump and Trade Update

In February 2019, U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) Robert Lighthizer testified before the House Ways & Means Committee regarding U.S.-China trade issues (see Trump and Trade Update of February 28, 2019). During the hearing, Lighthizer testified that an exclusion request process would be instituted on the third tranche of imported Chinese products subject to a

The Office of the U.S. Trade Representative has released another list of products that have been granted exclusions from the Section 301 tariffs on imported goods from China, granting exemptions in response to 348 separate exclusion requests for products that meet 21 specially prepared product descriptions. The exclusions cover a wide range of products, including

The Office of the U.S. Trade Representative issued another list of product exclusions from Section 301 tariffs on imported goods from China, granting full or partial exemptions in response to 87 separate exclusion requests, according to a pre-publication copy of the notice. The exclusions cover a wide range of products, including, inter alia, certain